You can’t sit out the dance

You can’t sit out the dance

For this little homily song on our journey through life, I have chosen a few pictures from my own travels.  This song niggles at me whenever I’d rather hide away from the world, trying to “sit out the dance”.  Perhaps subconsciously we write about the challenges we know from experience are hard to meet.  Having spent much of my working life helping people deal with the future, it’s always been worth remembering that whatever the future, or present, you have to work with it.  That way you also have a chance of shaping it! It’s not the first song I’ve written that has made me think I should practice what I preach!

Decisions, decisions

So we start with an obvious train-track image setting out clearly the long journey ahead: but I just love the chap standing bang in the middle of the tracks as if he is wondering what to do next – well, he is on the phone to someone trying to find out perhaps.  Of course the alternative could be to take the road on the left….

 

 

Some like to know where they’re heading

Some rather just leave it to chance

But however you tackle the future

You know you can’t sit out the dance

Rich or poor, you still have to play the game

Whoever you are, you still have to play the game you are in.

 

 

It may be a ball, with champagne on ice

It may be a barn dance, with the straw and the mice

Whatever your fancy, whatever your home

You can’t sit out the dance

Life keeps you jumping

I love this photo of the boys playing cricket on the endless beach of Chennai, India.  Wherever the ball goes or is coming from you have to play the game.  Though sometimes when you are young you are directed where to go, like these Japanese schoolchildren.

 

Life keeps you jumping, rest when you can

Between boredom and surprises, between dry toast and jam

Keep smiling and look forward, celebrate and applaud

All those who keep dancing, sweet lady, sweet lord

The dance of life follows many rhythms

 You can be on your toes, you can wallow in the mud, but you are still in the dance.

 

You may like the polka and wear little red shoes

Or something much slower, dance to the blues

Whatever you do, dance!

 

 

Move with your partner, sway with the band

Take your place for the dance

Thank you for reading and listening!  Enjoy the dance!

Ok, life’s a puzzle….

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The Art of the song

The Art of the song

This is the first of a series of blogs I will be doing in the coming months to introduce brand new videos for I know a little place, the first of my three albums.  Songs conjure up images in the mind of writer and of listener.  Here I have curated my own selection of wonderful images that have surprised me with their appropriateness for the lyrics. For me both lyrics and these artworks are depicting similar sentiments – even though I may being seeing something different in the Art from that intended by their great creators.  I hope you enjoy listening to this first song, Take it as it comes,  in the company of the talent of fourteen great European artists stretching across five centuries.

“All this will be ashes….”

My opening line “There will come a time when all this will be ashes” is more doom laden than I ever meant. To the rescue, Jacques Tissot’s 1868 depiction of Paris society in Le Cercle de la Rue Royale, sums up the idea that however smart we think we are, we won’t go on for ever.  Then Lawrence Alma–Tadema’s 1887 Women of Amphissa couldn’t be a better vision of passion spent. Next, Henri Gustave Jossot‘s 1894 series Artistes et Bourgeois satirises intellectual pretensions, as one asks “And your next book?” and the other replies “Oh, becoming simply Shakespearian!”  We are finally rescued from our musing as Brandenburgian Jacob Phillip Hackert’s fireworks explode Rome’s Castel Sant’ Angelo and allow us to celebrate, as they still do today.

Our transient life, with Tissot, Alma-Tadema, Jossot, and Hackert

“But until that time, keep an open mind….”

But we still search for knowledge. In La Tache Noire (or The Black Stain) Albert Bettannier, a French teacher tells his charges of the terrible loss of Alsace-Lorraine to Prussia in 1871. Then Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s depiction, of the trance-like spiritual transfiguration of Beatrix Portinari at the moment of her death, uncannily matches my words “when you see beyond” – though I wasn’t thinking of death particularly, but perhaps more the moment of insight, as in Joseph Wright of Derby’s “The Alchymist, In Search of the Philosopher’s Stone, Discovers Phosphorus, and prays for the successful Conclusion of his operation, as was the custom of the Ancient Chymical Astrologers”. At this point Gabriel von Max’s book-reading simian is just the ticket to keep our feet on the ground – “but until that time, keep an open mind”.

Our search for knowledge, with Bettannier, Rossetti, Wright and von Max

“When time passes slowly….”

Verse three starts with the woman in the window  spinning yarn,  a good task to accompany reflection – by another artist from the Franco-German borderland of Alsace, René-Paul Schützenberger.  British painter John William Waterhouse’s moody young man in red depicts the Roman Emperor Nero reflecting on matricide. In the next frame there is more family trouble: I saw this stunning painting by Évariste Vital Luminais last summer in the Musée des Beaux Arts in Quimper, Brittany –  King Gradlon on the white horse is trying to save his daughter from drowning, not knowing she has become an evil woman – her death at least calms the seas.  The final artwork, The Travelling Companions, by the wonderfully named Augustus Leopold Egg, now in the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery, allows us to relax with our favourite book on our train journey through life, or even fall asleep to the dulcet sounds of my harmonica – whatever, “take it as it comes”!

The short and the long of it, with Schutzenberger, Waterhouse, Luminais and Egg

“Breathe the air around you………….”

After the musical interlude we can drift reflectively through the successive images of my own shadow in the Dordogne sun, of another Rossetti beauty struggling to raise a smile in the sun, of Shakespeare’s Shrew Katherina, (by Edward Robert Hughes), thinking what to do when she is not being given food. Finally, staying in thespian company at table, we spy on Mr and Mrs David Garrick enjoying tea in the open air at “Garrick’s Villa” by the Thames at Hampton, by Johann Zoffany.  “Breathe the air around you, take it as it comes”.

 

Reflect with me, Rossetti, Hughes and Zoffany

“All the contrasts…..”

For our final verse we flip from the bright noisy utopian colours of Wenzel Hablik, to the drizzle of Julius von Ehren‘s German city, the brightness of Henri Biva’s lily pond in the summer sun, to the complex 16th century Nicholas Hilliard miniature of a handsome man, possibly the Earl of Essex, leaning upon a tree amongst roses.

The contrasts of life, with Hablik, von Ehren, Biva and Hilliard

And relax with the coda: “take it as it comes”

The song finally closes as Charles Bargue‘s black dog and a white parrot play their own game of chess, the liveried footman paying no heed, as Etienne-Prosper Berne-Bellecour’s Normandy shepherdess calmly “takes it as it comes” in the fading light, and as Johann Tischbein’s Goethe reflects on the Roman campagna.

Take it as it comes with Bargue, Bellecour and Tischbein

Art enhances music

For myself, this song now has many new dimensions in breadth and depth.  If you had asked me to write a song to fit the paintings I’d never have got there – albeit just a hypothesis as I doubt if these nineteen images would ever have appeared together.  It’s been like curating my own art exhibition around a theme, with help from the internet, Wikipedia etc, giving us access to all these public domain images from around the world. I’ve learnt more about art and have gained new insights on my own songs!

Take it as it comes!

The Season for Storytelling

The Season for Storytelling

Storyteller storyteller and Sleep baby of mine: two songs for the season for storytelling by the fire, and bedtime stories, from my albums Anguneau sunset and I know a little place

Escape into stories!

“Storyteller tell me, what I want to hear

Put a spin upon the news, make trouble disappear”

 

“Storyteller take me to where I want to be

I prefer to dream a dream, sail the wide blue sea”

Lullaby, lullaby

“I used to tell a story to my little girl

about the wizard who lived on the hill”

“None of these stories ever come to an end. Bedtime stories never do.

Children fall asleep and enter their dreams. That’s where the stories come true.”  

Have a great holiday!

Richard

 

Celebrating November

Celebrating November

“I really like November, the month I was born, twilight for the seasons of the sun”. Celebrate with my song Grey November Day, with Tom Waits’ November and my Confessions by Moonlight.

Scorpios unite

November day was overcast, couldn’t see the sky, mist drifting like a shroud

This song, and virtually the whole of my third album Sense in our brains, was written immediately after the Halloween birth of my wonderful granddaughter. The miracle of creation was obviously in the air. It is an optimistic meditative song, seeing the silver lining in the grey and Callie Howard’s wonderful backing vocals take it to another place for me. Quite rightly she has the first and last word on this one.

Now and then it drizzled without a reason why, rain sleeping in the clouds 

There is something very calming looking out of the window as the soft greyness of mist and light drizzle begins to offset the brightness and heat of summer.

If it had a colour November would be grey, doesn’t have to mean it’s boring  

Colour may be silver, colour may be slate, see it in a charcoal morning 

The charcoal idea was inspired by looking at the charcoal drawing by my mother, now the Sense in our brains album cover.  Quite appropriate really when I think of it as Mum was there when I was born…..

On the darker side….

Tom Waits’ song November from the 1990 musical The Black Rider, written with Robert Wilson and William S Burroughs, is hardly a celebration of the month but it is nonetheless a haunting song which perhaps matches the darker side of the month – from a musical with its dark side. And if you want Tom to start to look on the brighter side listen to You Can Never Hold Back Spring, one of my favourites from his 2006 triple album Orphans: Brawlers, Bawlers and Bastards.

And also born in November………

My Confessions by Moonlight accompanied by some of the first Movement of Beethoven’s Moonlight Sonata came into this world at 3pm on 3rd November 2012. So it too is a November child. From Tony Shepherd’s opening cymbal, through Richard Sadler’s bowed double bass and Bruce Knapp’s magical guitar intermission, this is one of my favourite songs even if I have borrowed the tune: but I haven’t heard anyone else sing a song to this movement. It comes right after Grey November Day on my third album, Sense in our brains.

Happy listening: do you have a favourite November song? or any other month for that matter………..